wordbirds

A lexicon of neologisms for the 21st century. Updated weekly. Need a word minted? Ask the wordbird. (And buy the BOOK to see 150 wordbirds you won't find anywhere else...)

RECELERATE

(V.)ree-‘sel-uh-rayt  To get back to speed after a vacation, break or lull. Also, literally, to speed up after slowing on the road. Usage: After two satisfying weeks of summer vacation, Meredith had to shake herself to recelerate and start getting ready for the fall semester. 

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

CROTCHFROCK

(N.) ‘krotch-frok A prideless fashion popular among college-age women this decade—a short dress that barely stretches to cover the private parts. Often worn with stripper heels. Usage: On Saturday night in New Haven, women teetered across York Street in tight dresses that barely covered their backsides. They looked like cross-dressers or exotic dancers, but in fact they were ordinary undergraduates, wearing crotchfrocks simply because that was “in”.

BESUNNED

(Adj.) be- ‘sund  To be besunned is to feel out-of-it, dazed or even queasy on hot, sunny, humid days. (Like being befogged, but in fair weather.) Usage: While biking across the Williamsburg Bridge on a bright, 90-degree afternoon, Adele suddenly felt faint, realized she was besunned, dismounted and chugged a bottle of water.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

GULLISNUGGLE

(V.) ‘gul-la-snug-gul   To affectionately cuddle up to someone, hug or embrace them, with the intention of asking them for a favor. May also be used as (n.)  Shorter variant: GULLIHUG. Usage: Wes was charmed when his wee daughter held out her arms for a hug, but as soon as he cuddled her, she coyly crowed, “Cookie, Daddy!” and he realized he’d been gullisnuggled.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

TEXTATIC

(adj.) tex-‘tat-ick  Describing the airheaded, giddy way people write in text messages, overdoing exclamation points out of fear that, without them, the tone might seem brusque. Also (adv.) TEXTATICALLY and (n.) TEXTASY (the ecstatic state in which one composes an excessively cheer-filled message). Usage:  Even in a note to the housecleaner, Lance could not restrain his textatic impulses. "Looking forward to your visit!" he wrote. "The cleaning supplies are under the sink! Email me if you have any questions!!"  At first he’d just ended the sentences with periods, but he’d decided it sounded too bossy and gruff, and changed it.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

N-Y-Glee

(Phrase) en-wy-glee  Elation one feels upon returning to, or being in, N-Y-C. Usage: Natasha had been down on New York for a while, but when she flew back to Manhattan after a holiday, she was filled with N-Y-Glee when she looked out her plane window and saw the Chrysler building and the city lights glittering in the night.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

NEMOFESTIPHOBIA

(N.) 'nee-mo-'fes-tif-'fo-bee-a  Fear that nobody will come to your party.  (from Latin nemo + festum + -phobia) Usage: Every time Karin and Theo threw a party, she panicked and invited twice as many people as she should have, convinced that nobody would come at all. Her nemofestiphobia never ebbed until every inch of floor space was filled by a guest, and she and Theo had run out of cups and mixers. 

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

SUPEREGOED UP

(Adj. Phrase) 'soo-per-ee-goad 'up  Describing those who are excessively ruled by guilt and by the idea of what they should do—not what they want to do. Usage: Jasper was too superegoed up to enjoy himself and take worthwhile risks. His friends found girlfriends, went on spontaneous trips, or bought apartments they could barely afford, but whenever something came along that tempted him, Jasper found a reason why he shouldn’t go for it.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

TRAVELAG

(N.) 'trav-a-lagThe distance between the time you realize you want to take a trip and the time you actually book it—held up by dithering over where to go, where to stay, how to get there, and how to afford it. Usage: In March, Bob and Jen decided they wanted to take a summer trip to Iceland, or Chile, or maybe Vietnam; but as July neared, they were still stuck in travelag, and had made no firm plans.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

TWIRED

(adj.)  'twy-erd To be simultaneously exhausted and really keyed up—tired + wired—a common affliction of toddlers and office workers. (Refers not only to online wiredness but to the overwrought mood, generally.)  Usage: Graham, his eyelids drooping with sleepiness, ran manically across the playground, scrambling up the jungle gym as his father called after him. He was overdue for his nap, but was too twired to settle down.

—§For other useful new coinages, check out the Wordbirds book—§

(An egret’s plume to Forrest for the suggestion)